Put through the paces: Jaguar XK and XK-R

Joining the infamous Jaguar two-door sports car family is the 2012 XK and XK-R. Starting at a base price of around $85k with the XK and rising to just above $100k with the R badge.

The base model XK, though the normally aspirated of the two, is no slouch. The free breathing V8 brings a healthy 385 Bhp in at 6500rpm and supplies 380lbs of torque at a lowly 3500rpm. All that power is put to the rear wheels via crisp six speed electronic paddle shifters. Keeping it shiny side up is Jaguar’s own adaptable traction and stability control systems.

When you’re taking it easy in automatic it’s easy to sit back and appreciate the luxury of the roomy and finely crafted interior. Neither the driver nor front passenger will ever complain about getting cramped. Only plan on bringing along one friend though. The back seats are a joke even if those two extra friends are double leg amputees.

When you finally do put the power down and hit those country roads this cat comes alive. If at all possible go for the soft top, on a nice day regrets are impossible. The suspension is soft enough to hit bumps and potholes without a second thought but firm enough to handle the corners like a pro.

The XK-R takes the range to the next level. Combining the same snappy transmission as the XK, stiffer suspension and the added supercharger you can tell where Jag is heading with this one. The R model gets a massive 510 horses blown into it and a tire melting 461lbs of torque to up the ante. These figures make for an exciting ride through the corners as well as add to the auditory experience. Select ‘R’ on the shifter knob and the exhaust opens up to a symphony of a baritone V8 and the soprano supercharger. Driver be warned though, while lateral grip of the XK-R is impressive mid-corner, exiting a corner can be hair-raising. The rear tires spin under power all too easy and you may be hard pressed to tell when they do let go.

Stiff suspension or not the convertible is the way to go on either model based on vocals alone. With the top down on a nice day you wont care how may bumps you hit. And when stringing a few switchbacks together you’ll be glad you only have one friend because the legless guys in the back would’ve only upset your weight distribution…